FREE TECH IN A DAY CLASS- NKARC

IMG_5572TECH IN A DAY” Class is being offered by the Northern Kentucky Amateur Radio Club on Saturday January 9,2016.
It will be held at the Erlanger branch of the Kenton County library (401 Kenton Lands Rd) on Saturday, January 9, between 10:00 AM and 5:30 PM. This class is totally free and your FCC license exam is included FREE!
PRE-REGISTRATION is REQUIRED by contacting ARRL-Kentucky Youth Coordinator Mark Volstad AI4BJ.
Pre-Register by email at: mvolstad@twc.com or call his cell #: 859-991-3906
It is important to emphasize that pre-study is absolutely required. The class will really be more of a review session, as there won’t be enough time to go into all the requirements in detail during the ~6 hours. The class and exam are both free, but pre-registration is required and the class is registered on the arrl.org web site.

ELF on the Self seen studying for Ham exam!

imageThe Elf was seen studying for a Ham License on the ARRL.ORG site! Word is Santa has promised new radios! Keep watching for updates!

THANKSGIVING MESSAGE FROM SM Alan KY1O

KENTUCKY SECTION NEWS – November 23, 2015
I send everyone a very Happy Thanksgiving and I hope you and your family/friends enjoy the holiday and get to spend some quality time together.
I am now back in KY after what was supposed to only be a 3-month temporary assignment on the US Naval Submarine Base New London in Groton, CT, which turned into an 8-month one. It was a lot of fun though getting an opportunity to spend that time traveling around sightseeing in New England and meeting many hams while up there in the area. At least my ONE call sign fit in up there I guess. LOL I will get to enjoy some time here with family and friends through New Years and get some projects I want to accomplish underway and maybe a few completed before I head out on my next safety consulting assignment.
Many are now gearing up for the National Parks On The Air 2016 Event and it sounds like it is going to be a lot of fun activating and operating from and with the various stations that will be set up in all the park locations around the USA during the year long Centennial celebration.
WRC-15 opened up more frequency allocation worldwide on the 60 meter band recently and as soon as the FCC completes their rules revision we will see some changes here in the US and be able to work more countries on that band. Please be very mindful of power limitations and other restrictions when operating on 60 meters.
There are still some volunteer opportunities available within the ARRL Kentucky Section, so visit this web site to see if you may be interested in serving in one of them soon: http://kyham.net/arrl/?page_id=277
If you have amateur radio news to share with others please send it to: ARRL Kentucky Section Public Information Coordinator Greg Lamb, W0QI at w0qi@arrl.net
If you want to know about Amateur Radio Emergency Services in the ARRL Kentucky Section please contact: Section Emergency Coordinator Cecil Dennis, K4TCD at k4tcd@arrl.net
If you need information about interference or have a complaint about inappropriate or illegal amateur operations please contact: ARRL Kentucky Section Official Observer Coordinator Bill Hilyerd, K4LRX at k4lrx@arrl.net
If you are needing some technical assistance with amateur radio or related information you can contact: ARRL Kentucky Section Technical Coordinator Chuck Milam, N9KY at n9ky@arrl.net
The four volunteers listed above are just a few of the many volunteers available in the ARRL Kentucky Section ready to assist you as ARRL Members, so take advantage of their services when needed.
Reminder: ARRL Annual Dues go up by $10 per year starting in 2016, so you may want to renew before the end of the year to take advantage of savings on your membership soon.
Again… Happy Thanksgiving… Take care for now & 73,
Alan, KY1O KY Section Manager

New 10 year old Ham!!

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We have a new ham in KY Region 4, District 10

Michael S, Fugate, KM4OPE

At 10 years old Mikey attained his Technician class license and is currently studying for his General license.
Mikey started listing to shortwave on a halicrafters S-120. After receiving his call he made his first contact in 10 minutes on VHF and later that evening he made 2, 10 meter contacts. He spends as much time on the radio as he can. In the picture you can see him on his Grandpa’s radio’s, KK4LLG

NKARC elects 2016 Officers

imageNorthern KY Amateur Radio Club NKARC elects new officers at their November meeting!
For more info go to: k4co.org
Your officers for NKARC 2016
Alan KA9GRY Treasurer, Cecil K4TCD Director, Judy W1ORO Vice- President, Greg W4TSA- President

SSB SWEEPSTAKES

Hi all-
Would your group like access to a real-time training exercise where you can work on important skills such as:
– Real-world training in passing messages quickly and efficiently
– Learning how to effectively communicate with specific parts of the country
– Develop listening skills under dense band conditions
– Receive a report card on your efficiency rate
If so, then ARRL Sweepstakes is for you. The third weekend in November, SSB Sweepstakes is based on old traffic-handling procedures going back decades. There are six items of data that must be passed with each QSO. You have 24 hours out of a 30-hour period to send and receive as many messages as you can. A bonus activity is to attempt to pass traffic with all 83 ARRL/RAC Sections over the time period. This year’s Sweepstakes runs from 2100 UTC Saturday, November 21 through 0259 UTC Monday, November 23 (Saturday afternoon through Sunday night in most of the US).
This is an excellent activity for your ARES group or club: real-world training, in a fun environment. If your group is large, split into smaller teams and go head-to-head against each other and see which team can do the best. Discuss your experiences over pizza and a cold one at your favorite restaurant after the event is over. Best of all, if you submit your log, you will get access to a report showing how accurately you sent and received your messages, which can lead to improved on-air technique and efficiency.
An ARRL Sweepstakes “how-to” guide is available for free download at www.arrl.org/sweepstakes
We can all use more on-air training; why not have fun at the same time?

73,
Sean Kutzko, KX9X
Media and Public Relations Managerares_cl

MARS / AMATEUR RADIO to TEST INTEROP Nov7-10

MARS-Generic%20logo_4

Preparations are nearly in place for the previously announced Military Auxiliary Radio System (MARS) coronal mass ejection (CME) disaster communication exercise, which will take place Saturday through Tuesday, November 7-10. Amateur Radio Emergency Service (ARES) and Radio Amateur Civil Emergency Service (RACES) groups are expected to participate in the quarterly contingency HF exercise in support of the US Department of Defense.

“We are looking forward to this exercise and the opportunity to partner and train with the larger Amateur Radio community,” Army MARS Program Manager Paul English, WD8DBY, told ARRL. The exercise scenario will simulate a CME event and focus on actions that radio operators should take prior to and following such an event, which could impact HF propagation. English said leaders from Army and Air Force MARS will hold a final exercise coordination telconference on Wednesday, October 28 “to answer any final questions about the exercise and make sure everyone is ready to train.”

English said he’s responded to some 90 inquiries from ARES and RACES groups as well as from individuals who would like to involve their ARES teams, and he expects about 50 ARES/RACES-affiliated organizations to participate. He said a few additional active duty military units also want to take part in the exercise.

English said the November would simulate a radio blackout as well as infrastructure damage. “During the exercise, we will simulate the blackout with a 3 hour pause, and then we will bring stations back on air and begin handling requests for information,” he told ARRL.

Training objectives for this exercise will include understanding what a CME is and how much forecast lead time can be expected; the effects associated with a CME, and what precautions radio operators take to protect their equipment, prior to a severe CME. Following the simulated CME, operators will assess its effects and report that information. This will involve “interoperation with Amateur Radio operators and groups to assist in assessment,” English said.

ARES and RACES teams, as well as individual radio amateurs, wishing to participate in this exercise may contact MARS and provide contact information.

 

TO FULFILL DOD INFORMATION REQUIREMENTS.

B. (U) CONCEPT OF OPERATIONS

(U) THIS COMMEX IS DESIGNED TO EXERCISE TASKS THAT WOULD NORMALLY

OCCUR FOR A PERIOD OF TIME OF SEVERAL DAYS OR LONGER. HOWEVER, THE

COMMEX IS CONDUCTED OVER A COMPRESSED TIME PERIOD. THIS IS A

HIGH PRIORITY ACTIVITY AND ALL MARS ASSETS AVAILABLE TO TRAIN

SHOULD PARTICIPATE IN THIS COMMEX.

(1) (U) NOTIFICATION PHASE

(U) THE TIME PERIOD 071200Z THROUGH 080900Z NOV 2015 IS THE

NOTIFICATION PHASE OF THE COMMEX.

(U) AT 071200Z NOV 2015 ALL MARS STATIONS WILL SIMULATE A

GROWING AWARENESS OF A NOTIONAL CME AND GEOMAGNETIC STORM

CONSIDERED LIKELY TO HIT EARTH AS DISCUSSED ON NOTIONAL

SOCIAL MEDIA AND NEWS NETWORKS. THE GROWING CONSENSUS

IS THIS CME IS LIKELY TO BE OF A CATASTROPHIC MAGNITUDE.

(U) DURING THIS PHASE, STATE MARS DIRECTORS AND STAFF SHOULD

PREPARE MARS STATIONS FOR A POTENTIAL COMMUNICATIONS

DISRUPTION AND SOCIALIZE TECHNIQUES WITH THEIR SUBORDINATES TO

PROTECT RADIO AND COMPUTER EQUIPMENT. ADDITIONALLY, AMARS

STATE CIVIL AFFAIRS OFFICERS AND AFMARS STATE EMERGENCY

COORDINATORS SHOULD WORK TOGETHER TO BEGIN COORDINATION

ACTIVITIES WITH LOCAL AMATEUR ORGANIZATIONS. REGION MARS

DIRECTORS AND OPERATIONS STAFF SHOULD PREPARE FOR PERIODS

OF HIGH INTENSITY AND SUSTAINED NETWORK OPERATIONS. MARS

MEMBERS SHOULD MAINTAIN EMAIL AND TELEPHONE CONTACT WITH

THEIR STATE MARS STAFF, CHECK INTO REGULARLY SCHEDULED

MARS NETS, CHECK AND TEST EQUIPMENT, SOFTWARE AND

REFERENCE INFORMATION TO ENSURE THEY ARE UP TO DATE AND

OPERATIONAL IN ALL AREAS.

(U) AT 080001Z NOV 2015 G2 SOURCES WILL NOTIFY MARS OF AN

IMPENDING CME. DOD WILL DIRECT MARS PROGRAMS TO IMPLEMENT A

POSTURE TO ENSURE SURVIVALABILITY OF THEIR INDIVIDUAL STATIONS,

DISCONNECT RADIO AND COMPUTER EQUIPMENT FROM ALL WIRING BETWEEN

THE HOURS OF 080900Z THROUGH 081200Z NOV 2015. MARS MEMBERS

WILL BE NOTIFIED OF POTENTIAL REQUESTS FOR INFORMATION FOLLOWING

CME IMPACT. MARS STATIONS SHOULD COMMUNICATE INFORMATION

RELEVANT TO PROTECTING EQUIPMENT FROM THE EFFECTS OF THE

GEOMAGNETIC STORM TO ALL MARS MEMBERS AND FINALIZE PREPARATIONS

FOR OPERATIONS.

(2) (U) GEOMAGNETIC STORM PHASE

(U) BETWEEN 080900Z THROUGH 081200Z NOV 2015 THE NOTIONAL GEOMAGNETIC

STORM WILL OCCUR. ALL MARS STATIONS RADIO AND COMPUTER

EQUIPMENT SHALL BE PHYSICALLY DISCONNECTED FROM ANTENNAS, POWER

MAINS, AND INTERCONNECT WIRING IN A MANNER THAT PROVIDES THE

BEST PROTECTION FROM THE EFFECTS OF THE GEOMAGNETIC STORM.

(U) NO EXERCISE RADIO OPERATIONS WILL BE CONDUCTED DURING THE

GEOMAGNETIC STORM PHASE.

(3) (U) POST GEOMAGNETIC STORM PHASE / HIGH INTENSITY NETWORK

OPERATIONS (HINO)

(U) AT 081200Z NOV 2015 MARS STATIONS WILL OBSERVE NOTIONAL LOSS OF

ELECTRICAL POWER, TELECOMMUNICATIONS, AND CYBERSPACE AS A RESULT

OF THE NOTIONAL GEOMAGNETIC STORM. BASED ON THESE NOTIONAL

TRIGGER EVENTS, MARS STATIONS SHALL TAKE INDIVIDUAL ACTION THAT

COLLECTIVELY ACTIVATES HF RADIO NETWORKS AT ALL LEVELS.

COMSPOT REPORTS SHALL BE GENERATED AT EACH LEVEL AND SENT TO

HIGHER.

(U) SHORTLY AFTER 081200Z NOV 2015, A REQUEST FOR INFORMATION FOR

COUNTY MESSAGES WILL BE FORWARDED TO MARS. MARS STATIONS

IN EACH COUNTY OR ADJACENT OR NEARBY COUNTIES WILL COMPLETE

COUNTY MESSAGES AS TASKED.

(U) MARS MEMBERS, USING THEIR AMATEUR RADIO LICENSE, SHALL CONTACT

AMATEUR RADIO STATIONS AND CONVERSE WITH AMATEUR OPERATORS TO

OBTAIN THE INFORMATION VARIABLES NECESSARY TO COMPLETE THE COUNTY

REPORTS. MARS STATIONS SHOULD NOT EXPECT AMATEUR STATIONS TO

KNOW FIPS COUNTY CODES OR THE COUNTY MESSAGE FORMAT. BECAUSE

EXERCISING THE MARS/AMATEUR RADIO SERVICE INTERFACE IS A PRIMARY

OBJECTIVE OF THIS COMMEX, MARS STATIONS SHOULD OFFER LOCAL AMATEUR

STATIONS EVERY OPPORTUNITY TO TRAIN IN THIS COMMEX TO INCLUDE TAKING

DUPLICATE INFORMATION FROM AMATEUR SOURCES WHEN THE INFORMATION

MAY BE AVAILABLE DIRECTLY TO THE MARS STATION.

(U) AMATEUR RADIOS OPERATORS THAT WOULD NORMALLY OPERATE AT A

STATE OR LOCAL GOVERNMENT EMERGENCY OPERATIONS CENTER OR AT

ANOTHER GOVERNMENT OR CIVIL FACILITY DURING AN ACTUAL EVENT OF

THIS TYPE MAY SIMULATE OPERATING FROM THAT FACILITY DURING THIS

COMMEX, AS APPROPRIATE. THE INTENT OF THIS COMMEX IS NOT TO

REQUEST ACTIVATION OF STATE/LOCAL OR CIVIL FACILITIES, RATHER

TO EXERCISE NFORMATION EXCHANGE BETWEEN MARS AND AMATEUR NETWORKS.

(U) IT IS IMPORTANT TO NOTE THAT ONLY REAL-WORLD INFORMATION IS

COLLECTED. SIMULATED OR NOTIONAL CONDITIONS ARE NOT REPORTED.

IE: IF THE POWER IS REALLY ON, THEN THE REPORT SHALL BE THE

POWER IS ON.

SKYWARN Recognition event in December

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SKYWARN™ Recognition Day is December 5th

The 17TH annual SKYWARN Recognition Day (SRD) special event will take place Saturday, December 5, 2015, from 0000 UTC to 2400 UTC. SKYWARN Recognition Day, co-sponsored by the American Radio Relay League and the National Weather Service, pays tribute to Amateur Radio operators for the vital public service they perform. During the 24-hour event, Amateur Radio operators visit their local National Weather Service (NWS) office and work as a team to contact other hams across the world. This event is also aimed at strengthening the bond between Amateur Radio operators and local NWS offices.
The volunteer SKYWARN program comprises nearly 290,000 trained severe weather spotters — many of them radio amateurs — who identify severe storms and provide NWS forecasters with reports of local weather conditions during severe weather events.

SKYWARN Recognition Day is not a contest. The object is for stations to exchange some basic information with as many NWS stations as possible on 80 meters through 70 centimeters (excluding 1.25 meters). Repeater contacts are permitted. Stations exchange call signs, signal reports, locations, and a one or two-word description of the weather at their respective locations.

The National Weather Service provides event information on this Web site: http://hamradio.noaa.gov.

imageThe John W Farler Elmer  award. Was presented to John W Farler at the monthly meeting of the KY Mountains Amateur Radio Club, John has elmered many hams over the years, and has been very instrumental in testing teaching and just a great support to the amateur radio operators of Eastern Kentucky.

from KY Region 4 Facebook post

HCARES Red Cross Report by Christina Gast, KY4CG

The American Red Cross

When people hear the words American Red Cross, many think of blood drives. The American Red Cross does more than that. We have local Disaster Services teams that work to . We take care of the disasters that happen locally and nationwide. In Disaster Services, We tend to the families that have recently experienced the loss or damage to their home due to a house fire, flooding, or other disaster. We open up shelters when needed. We are there when severe weather hits the area, such as a tornadoes, ice storms, or blizzards.

Just recently, in March 2015, Kentucky was hit with a big snow storm that had shut down I-65 in Hardin County overnight. There were motorist stranded alongside the road in their vehicles. American Red Cross came in and opened up two shelters on March 5th, 2015. One shelter was at the Prichard Community Center in Elizabethtown, and the other was at Colvin Community Center in Radcliff. Many local First responders were helping to get the families to the shelters and getting their vehicles dug out of all the snow, so that each family can get back out on the road.

The American Red Cross is predominantly a volunteer organization. Many volunteers have full time jobs, they may be stay at home mothers and/or fathers. Some volunteers also work with other local volunteer groups, such as Amateur Radio Emergency Service, Search and Rescue, and many others. These people take time out of their day and away from their own family to help the families in need, even if they are the ones that may need it. All of the volunteers enjoy what it is that they all do to help out our community in the time of need.

The American Red Cross also helps communities prepare for disasters before they hit to reduce the impact or prevent them altogether. Through the Home Fire Prevention Campaign, volunteers go to their local communities and install smoke detectors in their homes. This helps make the families feel a little safer when they know they can rely on something like that if a fire does. The Goal of the HFPC is to reduce the number of deaths due to home fires. The American Red Cross works with the local Fire Departments, and other groups in the community to help make all of this happen.

The American Red Cross organizes teams to go into each home to help with the installation of the smoke detectors so that it is done in a timely and professional manor. Local Fire Departments and others in the community help out with installation of the smoke detectors. Each team has an Educator who talks to the family about fire safety, explains to them what they are doing, and helps them make a fire safety plan/route. There is also a Reporter. This person records the family’s escape plan and information to indicate how many smoke detectors, number of family members, how many smoke detectors are changed for historical records. An Install team will install the smoke detectors or change batteries if needed. Local Firefighters, mostly volunteers, assist to ensure the detectors are placed in the most effective locations, review escape plans, and identify hazards.

The week of October 4th through the 10th was Fire Prevention Week. The American Red Cross kicked off the Home Fire Campaign that week. They did installs in Hardin and Meade County. Families signed up at their local City Hall or Emergency Management office. We started in the city of Brandenburg, followed by Muldraugh, and finished up in West Point. When we were finished, we had installed over 700 smoke detectors.

For more information visit www.redcross.org or call the Red Cross Hardin/Larue office at (270) 765-4979.