Welcome a new operator: Jennifer Garrigus, KK4CEH

Welcome a new operator: Jennifer Garrigus, KK4CEH

Shelby Ennis, W8WN sends:

 

Jen, KK4CEH, making contact on 2 meters

Welcome a new operator to our area, Jennifer Garrigus, KK4CEH, Clarkson. She is the daughter of Derrick Garrigus, KJ4VHZ. Jennifer, KK4CEH and Lora Ennis, WD8LPN, of Elizabethtown, were on the air for about 15 minutes on the morning of May 21st, and she sounds great. Jennifer, KK4CEH and Kyle Robinson, KJ4ZSF, of Boston, also talked briefly. Watch for Jen, KK4CEH on the repeater, and also on 10 meters (especially digital).

(And I believe it was announced last week that David Gregory, K4DCG, Elizabethtown, has his Extra now!)

2011 Kentucky ARES Conference Set

KY ARRL Section Manager, Jim Brooks, KY4Z, wrote this article for the SERA Journal:

2011 Kentucky ARES Conference set for Oct. 8th in Bardstown


The annual Kentucky Section ARES Conference will take place Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011, at the Bardstown-Nelson County Civic Center, 321 S. Third St. in Bardstown. The conference is the annual statewide gathering of Kentucky Amateur Radio operators who participate in the ARES program and use their skills and equipment to assist their communities with communications when the need may arise.

The conference will include presentations and discussions on a variety of topics. The agenda is still under consideration, but will be published on the conference website, www.KyARESConference.com. Pre-registration for the event is requested.

Also taking place during the conference is the 31st Annual Bardstown Arts, Crafts & Antiques Show, an event that brings more than 200 vendors to town for an outdoor show and sale on the streets of the historic Bardstown downtown district. It’s a great place for the family to spend the day while the OM takes in the ARES conference. The arts, crafts and antique show runs both Saturday, Oct. 8 and Sunday, Oct. 9. Bring the family and enjoy the beautiful fall colors of Central Kentucky.

For more information or to provide suggestions on conference presentations you would like to see, visit the conference website, www.kyaresconference.com or contact SM Jim Brooks, KY4Z, ky4z@arrl.org, or SEC Kenny Garrett, N4KLG, sec@kyham.net.

2011 Kentucky ARES Conference Set

KY ARRL Section Manager, Jim Brooks, KY4Z, wrote this article for the SERA Journal:

2011 Kentucky ARES Conference set for Oct. 8th in Bardstown

The annual Kentucky Section ARES Conference will take place Saturday, Oct. 8, 2011, at the Bardstown-Nelson County Civic Center, 321 S. Third St. in Bardstown. The conference is the annual statewide gathering of Kentucky Amateur Radio operators who participate in the ARES program and use their skills and equipment to assist their communities with communications when the need may arise.

The conference will include presentations and discussions on a variety of topics. The agenda is still under consideration, but will be published on the conference website, www.KyARESConference.com. Pre-registration for the event is requested.

Also taking place during the conference is the 31st Annual Bardstown Arts, Crafts & Antiques Show, an event that brings more than 200 vendors to town for an outdoor show and sale on the streets of the historic Bardstown downtown district. It’s a great place for the family to spend the day while the OM takes in the ARES conference. The arts, crafts and antique show runs both Saturday, Oct. 8 and Sunday, Oct. 9. Bring the family and enjoy the beautiful fall colors of Central Kentucky.

For more information or to provide suggestions on conference presentations you would like to see, visit the conference website, www.kyaresconference.com or contact SM Jim Brooks, KY4Z, ky4z@arrl.org, or SEC Kenny Garrett, N4KLG, sec@kyham.net.

New Assistant Section Manager for Youth appointed in Kentucky

KY ARRL Section Manager, Jim Brooks, KY4Z, wrote this article for the SERA Journal:

New Assistant Section Manager for Youth Appointed in Kentucky

Elijah Brooks, KJ4FZX, was recently appointed Assistant Section Manager for Youth in the ARRL Kentucky Section. Elijah, 15, will be a sophomore this fall at Nelson County High School in Bardstown, Ky.,He has been licensed since 2008.

He is currently involved in the Nelson County Area Technical Center’s IT program as well as the SkillsUSA club. The club members are involved in a variety of technology areas, including Amateur Radio satellites, RF fox hunting and balloon launches with Amateur Radio-related payloads. Earlier this year the club, using the Nelson ATC’s Amateur Radio satellite station, facilitated the state’s first direct student ham radio contact with astronauts aboard the International Space Station.

 

Elijah Brooks, KJ4FZX, at the Ashland Hamfest

While attending the Ashland, Ky. Tail Gate hamfest on April 30th, Elijah participated in a balloon launch the school took part in with Murray State University. The balloon carried a payload assembled by Nelson ATC IT teacher Charlie Cantrill, KI4RDT that included a simplex repeater operating on in the 70 cm ham band. The balloon was launched from Owenton, Ky., about 10 a.m. that morning. Once the balloon was aloft, Elijah used a handheld homebrew yagi and handie-talkie to communicate with his teacher, KI4RDT and other students at the balloon launch site. Several others at the Ashland hamfest made contacts via the simplex repeater while it was aloft, including ARRL Great Lakes Division Director Jim Weaver, K8JE.

 

Elijah enjoys learning about many different types of technology and how it can be applied in the world we live in. As a newly appointed ASM, he will be assigned to report on activities of interest to youth. He looks forward to meeting other hams his own age and talking tech.

He is the son of Kentucky Section Manager Jim, KY4Z, and Tammy Brooks, KC4CTB. He is currently licensed as a Technician but is studying to upgrade to General.

Contact Elijah at kj4fzx@arrl.net.

May is most active severe weather month in central Kentucky; Residents urged to have working weather radio at home

(This is a news release by John Bobel, Public Information Officer Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government)

As people throughout the southern part of the United States continue to clean-up after the devastating tornadoes and severe storms of late April, Lexington’s Division of Emergency Management wants to remind citizens that the months of May and June are actually more active for severe weather.

“Normally, we have several hundred severe weather watches and warnings in the months of May and June,” said Patricia Dugger, Lexington’s Director of Emergency Management.  “From severe thunderstorms and high winds to tornadoes and flooding, Fayette County will experience more dangerous weather conditions over the next two months.”

Long range forecasters confirm that the greatest potential for active severe weather in Kentucky is still ahead.  This year, the long range forecast calls for a wetter-than-usual May and June with slightly cooler temperatures.  However, weather systems will continue to push warm, moist air into the region.  When the warm, moist air meets the colder temperatures, severe storms and tornadoes can result.

“There  are many ways that people in Lexington can be aware of the potential for severe weather, including listening to local radio, television and website or email-based weather alerts,” said Dugger.
“But the best way is to have a NOAA weather alert radio in your home and or workplace, make sure it’s working correctly and turned on!  A weather radio that’s turned off  won’t help anyone.”

A NOAA weather alert radio is tied into a nationwide network of radio stations that broadcast continuous weather information directly from the nearest National Weather Service office.  The service operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week.  The NOAA weather radio system is also tied to the Federal Communication Commission’s (FCC’s) Emergency Alert System.
So NOAA weather radios also receive information on hazardous events, such as earthquakes, chemical releases or oil spills and public safety bulletins – like Amber Alerts.

The latest NOAA weather radios include the SAME alert system, which allows the user to specify the particular area for watches, warnings and alerts.  Once programmed for Fayette County alerts, these radios will only sound if there is a local watch, warning or other emergency bulletin.

More information about NOAA weather radios is available from the Division of Emergency Management’s website:  www.bereadylexington.com.

During severe weather conditions, citizens are also encouraged to know how to keep with the latest weather information from local television and radio stations.  Many organizations – including Lexington’s Division of Emergency Management – have Facebook and Twitter social media accounts that post severe weather alerts.

In addition to local television and radio stations, severe weather alerts are broadcast on the city’s traveler’s radio service, Radio Lexington, which operates at 1620 KHz on the AM band.  Additionally, the Lexington Emergency Alert and Notification system (LEAN) provides notice to mobile and land-line telephones.  To register for the notification service, visit the LEAN website at www.lexingtonky.gov/lean.  Local television stations and other weather-related websites have text-message and telephone alert systems as well.

More information about severe weather prepared is available from the Division of Emergency Management website available at:
www.bereadylexington.com or www.lexingtonky.gov/dem.  Information from the division is also available through the Lexington Emergency Management Facebook page – Lexington KY Emergency Management.
Information is also available via the Division of Emergency Management Twitter account: www.twitter.com/lexkyem.

District 11 Responds to Severe Weather

ARES District 11 Amateur Radio operators kept the airwaves active during the recent severe weather outbreak. About 6:00 AM on the morning of April 27th Randall Gilreath, Emergency Coordinator, McCreary Co. Dist. 11 ARES activated what he called “an informal net” on the 444.050 linked repeater system in Williamsburg, Ky. (444.050+ 100.0 Hz PL) and Shelbyville, Ky. (444.050+ 91.5 Hz PL) with links to Middlesboro, Ky. (442.325+ 100.0 Hz PL) and Jonesville, Va. (442.575+ 100.0 Hz PL). That “informal net” ultimately linked the State EOC and National Weather Service offices in Jackson and Louisville with Amateur Radio Operators on the ground in District 11 providing eyes-on reports of the day’s events.

Early on the link between NWS Jackson and the State EOC was tested with help from Tony Edwards, KJ4FYM, at NWS Jackson and Pat Compton, KF4FNZ, at the State EOC by using the 2 meter remote base on the 444.050 repeater in Williamsburg. “The 2 meter frequency was 146.550 simplex and we were able to communicate with the Jackson weather office via this link,” EC Gilreath explained.

As the morning wore on what was to become an historic day in Kentucky’s Weather Annals would keep Skywarn Spotters in McCreary, Whitley, Laurel, and Bell counties busy. Gilreath listed some of the Spotters, “WB4IVB Henry, KB4PTJ Will, KF4GUI Woody, KI4TMP Leroy, KI4UMF Tim, KG4FGY Norman, KF4PNP Roger, KF4PNO James, AJ4G Ralph, W4TEY Ed, KA4BQQ Lloyd, and several more who gave reports but I was unable to catch their name and call signs.” SEC Kenny Garrett, N4KLG, established Gilreath on the NWS Weather Chat chat room providing real-time reports to forecasters from the heart of District 11.

I want to thank Will Jones, KB4PTJ, who owns the machines in Williamsburg and Shelbyville, and Henry Hamblen, WB4IVB, who owns the Middlesboro and Jonesville, Va equipment,” Gilreath said. “And Alva (Buddy) Kidwell, KB4EBP, and Mike Swigert, KE4YRI on the Shelbyville side of the link who were instrumental in helping establish the link with the State EOC and the Louisville NWS office.”